Will 100-pound salmon return to Elwha?

The famed runs of salmon are expected to return after two dams are removed but will they be as big?

The Elwha Dam and Glines Canyon Dam on the Elwha River of the Olympic Peninsula were built in violation of an 1890 law which required fish passage facilities on dams “wherever food fish are wont to ascend”.   The logging companies were so powerful that the fisheries commissioner allowed them to get by with a hatchery, that never worked, instead of the required passage facilities. The dams blocked miles and miles of premium salmon and steelhead spawning grounds in Olympic National Park which produced enormous Chinook salmon that were reported to have reached 100 pounds and are thought to have been up to 12 years old!

Now the dams are going to be removed nearly 100 years after their construction. Will the 100 lb Chinook return?

Will 100-pound salmon return to Elwha?.
By PAUL GOTTLIEB – PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sockeye numbers reach highest level in decades in Idaho’s Sawtooth country

This is very good news!! They were almost extinct 15 years ago.

Sockeye numbers reach highest level in decades. A total of 386 sockeye salmon had arrived in the Sawtooth Valley by Tuesday [August 19]. By JASON KAUFFMAN, Idaho Mountain Express Staff Writer

Good news! Endangered sockeye salmon beat projections in Columbia

Endangered sockeye salmon beat projections in Columbia River. AP. Idaho Statesman.

After the collapse of the spring chinook salmon run into the Sacramento River this year, there was fear it would be general; but the sockeye salmon run bound for interior Oregon, Washington, and Idaho is 6 times that of last year.

There are numerous species of salmon and runs of those species.  In many years some do well and others not. In others almost all are up or down.

Bush issues final court-ordered plans for Columbia River salmon

Agencies issue plan to run Columbia dams, conserve salmon. By Jeff Bernard. Associated Press.

It is very expensive, but does not remove the major problem — the dams on the lower Snake River. It may or may not meet the demands of U.S. District Judge James Redden who has been very hostile to past Administration efforts to meet the standards of the Endangered Species Act on the impereled salmon runs.

Matters have been complicated this year by very hostile conditions in the Pacific ocean. There has been a collapse of the food chain, prompting an moratorium on commercial salmon fishing off the coast of California and Oregon (after a recent record salmon run in the Sacramento River last year).