Latest wolf news from Idaho Fish and Game. March 1-15, 2009

Here is the latest news as written by Idaho Fish and Game. It has a wolf and livestock mortality table. Ralph Maughan

– – – – – – – –

IDAHO WOLF MANAGEMENT
PROGRESS REPORT

To: Idaho Fish and Game Staff and Cooperators

From: IDFG Wolf Program Coordinator, Steve Nadeau

Subject: Status of Gray Wolf Management, Weeks of March 1 – March 15, 2009.

Delisting: FWS – Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Status (WY, MT, ID):

For the time being, all wolves to the north of Interstate- 90 in Idaho remain listed as endangered. All wolves in the southern half of Montana, all portions of Idaho south of Interstate-90, and all of Wyoming are being managed under the 2005 and 2008 Endangered Species Act nonessential experimental population 10j regulations. The State of Idaho Department of Fish and Game is acting as the designated agent for the USFWS in implementing day-to-day management of wolves under the MOU between the Secretary of Interior and Governor of Idaho signed January 2006.

Delisting wolves and assuring their proper long-term management is and has been of highest priority for the state of Idaho and the Fish and Game Department. We continue to work along with the Department of Interior, Department of Justice, and other states and interveners toward the eventual delisting of wolves in the Northern Rocky Mountains, and move toward state management under the State Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and the Wolf Population Management Plan. All the work appears to have recently come to fruition.

News on delisting

On March 6, 2009, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar affirmed the decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to remove gray wolves from the list of threatened and endangered species in the western Great Lakes and the Northern Rocky Mountain states of Idaho and Montana and parts of eastern Washington and Oregon and a small part of north central Utah.

Read the rest of this entry »

Phantom Hill wolf pack hunts near Hailey, Idaho

Should the pack be hazed?

This is a no-brainer. Of course, the pack should be hazed. They are not afraid of people because they have not had an experience that tells them to be.

Hazing will do the local people even more good. Wolves close by worry many folks, and they are a threat to their pet dogs. They are also a temptation for some foolish person who might decide to feed them.

Hazing them doesn’t hurt the wolves, and the Wood River Valley’s much loved local wolf pack will be much safer if they are told to keep a distance.

Story: Wolf pack hunts near central Idaho town. AP

– – – –
Update 3/16/09:
Intense footage of a Phantom approaching dogs last Thursday, March 12. Video via PlumTV

Vodpod videos no longer available.
The Malamutes owner had been previously warned of the Phantoms presence, despite the warning, the Malamutes were a distance from their owners home in a field next to Greenhorn Road and were barking. The member of the Phantom Hill wolf pack is believed to be the 2-year old male. The wolf came off the steep mountainside onto the road, looked at the dogs and incredibly jumped over the wooden fence. Within a couple of seconds, the wolf took off. 2 Photographers from the local Plum TV station happened to be there. Greenhorn road is a public access through private property in a large canyon between Ketchum and Hailey, Idaho. Homeowners of the Golden Eagle subdivision, an upscale development at the mouth of Greenhorn Gulch, have been feeding hay to 150 head of elk all winter. It was just a matter of time before the Phantom Hill wolves, or another pack, discovered the tamed elk.
Another video via Channel 11 News

~ be

– – – –

Earlier post. March 2, 2009. Photos: Phantom Hill wolf pack takes a mountain lion.

Photos: Phantom Hill wolf pack takes a mountain lion

Some exciting news in central Idaho today – The Phantom Hill wolf pack made an appearance over the weekend igniting excitement from valley residents and wolf watchers.

Update 3/4/09: Predators clash above ElkhornIdaho Mountain Express

Wolf jam, March 1, 2009. Photo by Lynne K. Stone, Copyright 2009

Wolf jam, March 1, 2009. Photo by Lynne K. Stone, Copyright 2009

The Phantoms were in view – word got around and it was a wolf jam at the best viewing place.

Read the rest of this entry »

Idaho wolf update Sept. 26 – Oct. 17, 2008. Phantom Hill wolf-sheep project worked!

Here is the latest wolf news from the Idaho Fish and Game Department-

It looks like efforts to keep the Phantom Hill wolf pack from killing domestic sheep in the headwaters of the Big Wood River/Boulder/Smoky Mountains north of Ketchum, Idaho was highly successful. Only one sheep was killed by a wolf during the summer through the end of the grazing season. Many sheep graze this scenic mountain area.

This major project was conducted by “Four producers, USFS, USDA Wildlife Services, IDFG, Blaine County Commission, and Defenders of Wildlife.”

I should add that the Wolf Recovery Foundation, of which I am President, gave this effort a major (for us) monetary contribution.

Ralph Maughan

– – – – – – – – –
IDAHO WOLF MANAGEMENT
BI-WEEKLY PROGRESS REPORT

To: Idaho Fish and Game Staff and Cooperators

From: IDFG Wolf Program Coordinator, Steve Nadeau
Subject: Status of Gray Wolf Management, Weeks of Sept. 26- Oct. 17, 2008.

New: FWS – Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Status (WY, MT, ID): The U.S. Federal District Court in Missoula, Montana, issued a preliminary injunction on Friday, July 18, 2008, that immediately reinstated temporary Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in the northern Rocky Mountain DPS pending final resolution of the case. This includes all of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming, the eastern one-third of Washington and Oregon, and parts of north-central Utah.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Idaho wolves, Wolves. Tags: , , , . Comments Off on Idaho wolf update Sept. 26 – Oct. 17, 2008. Phantom Hill wolf-sheep project worked!

Photos of Idaho’s Phantom Hill Wolf Pack

The Phantom Hill wolf pack is considered by some as Ketchum, Idaho’s own. First discovered this year, the pack has been around for more than a year, however, because it has yearlings.

Its range is in the Boulder and Smoky Mountains, bisected by scenic Idaho Highway 75, about 25 miles north of Ketchum. On one side of the Highway is the grazing allotment of Lava Lake Land and Livestock, a very wildlife friendly outfit that decided not to put its sheep in this year to help the wolf pack. On the Smoky Mountain side the rancher is not progressive.

Somehow they survived the summer with some help from a person hired by the Forest Service, or Idaho Fish and Game (not sure). This person’s job was to haze them away from livestock.

At any rate, a lot of folks have seen them crossing the road.

Lynne Stone of Stanley sent the photos below of the alpha female and a yearling. She caught them other day on her way through. They aren’t the greatest photos, but we don’t get many photos of Idaho wolves, despite there being 700 of them. Thanks Lynne!

The alpha female has a limp.

See photos: all copyrighted

Read the rest of this entry »