U.S. Department of Agriculture Shoots Wild Bull Bison in Idaho

BFC‘s Press Release :

Buffalo Bull © Ken Cole

Buffalo Bull © Ken Cole

ISLAND PARK, IDAHO: Federal agents with the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture shot and killed a bull bison this afternoon. The bull had migrated to the area from Yellowstone National Park and was grazing to the south of Twin Creek, near the Nature Conservancy’s Flat Ranch property.

According to Buffalo Field Campaign Habitat Coordinator Darrell Geist, who witnessed the shooting, “This is part of the bison’s historic migration. For the past several years we’ve seen bison attempt to access their native habitat in Idaho only to be met with a bullet. As today’s shooting makes perfectly clear, Idaho shares Montana’s intolerance for native bison.”

Fewer than 3,000 native wild bison exist in the United States, all inhabiting areas in and around Yellowstone National Park. Since 2000, under the Interagency Bison Management Plan, more than 3,500 members of this population have been killed at a heavy cost to taxpayers. The purported reason for the slaughter is to prevent the transmission of brucellosis, a European livestock disease. Wild bison have never transmitted brucellosis to cattle and it is not possible for bulls, like the one killed today, to transmit the disease.

Buffalo Field Campaign is the only group working in the field, every day, to stop the slaughter of the wild American buffalo. Volunteers defend the buffalo and their habitat and advocate for their lasting protection. For more information, video footage of today’s operation, and photos visit: Buffalo Field Campaign (http://www.buffalofieldcampaign.org).

Posted in Bison. 11 Comments »

11 Responses to “U.S. Department of Agriculture Shoots Wild Bull Bison in Idaho”

  1. Jim Macdonald Says:

    And, yet guess what I saw inside the park between the boundary and the Bechler Ranger Station on Thursday?

    3 cows wandering around untouched within the boundaries of Yellowstone National Park …

  2. IzabelaM Says:

    I hate the sensless killing. Where did all my letters to Obama go? Where did all the petitions go?
    I wonder if anyone in our goverment even reads the letters and petitions. I voted for Obama with a hope for better. Nothing has changed. Nothing.

  3. Save bears Says:

    Well? What did you expect?

  4. Jim Macdonald Says:

    That’s why people voted for Schweitzer … for Obama … it would be great to be wrong when predicting exactly this … but it doesn’t happen; it’s not possible to change this injustice within the electoral system.

    I’m looking forward to the BFC/WWP workshop this week to have an open mind toward a different tactic. I must admit some skepticism even toward this proposed tactic, but I’m willing to go for it full gusto if I think there’s a chance that we can do something for these unfortunate animals …

    When I see cattle untouched inside Yellowstone National Park but see wild buffalo not tolerated even in lands they should be most tolerated outside of it, I just want to scream, especially when we keep making the same mistake of thinking a politician is going to fix this without real pressure.

    I really hope that this workshop gives me another tool with which I and others can apply that real pressure that forces politicians to move.

  5. Save bears Says:

    These issues that are so important to us, are such a little blip on the day of a Washington Politician, it is like a bug hitting the window when your driving down the road…there is such a disconnect between WA and the rest of the country it is not even funny…anybody that “Thought” voting for Obama was going to change anything, I am sorry, you were fooling yourself and it is sad to see so many feeling so foolish..and I am not calling anyone a fool, but once again, WA has told us all to bend over with a smile and enjoy the day at the table, I am dishing up, it is the same shit, I have been listening to for over 20 years when it concerns Bison, I really wish I could attend this workshop, despite my differences with some that will be there it would be nice to talk to people of like minds…..

    The only way, this is going to change is awareness and getting rid of the WA political machine and start over and keep starting over, until such time as laws are followed and the people we hire understand they work for us…I am so tired of this….but will wake up in the AM with the same damn conviction I have had for the last 20 years….

  6. Save bears Says:

    And despite my comment on another thread, I am not desperate, just a bit disappointed again, but it will never cause me to wavier in my thoughts or actions…I will continue to be that bug, chewing on their arm until one of two things happen, either death or a real change in policies…

  7. Brian Ertz Says:

    Jim,
    there is a third branch of government that’s equal to the 2 others & relatively (supposed to be) independent of the political quagmires we find elsewhere. With time & effort, our positions can be framed, our qualms prepared, in such a way that grants us an opportunity to have them considered on their merit – on our reason, and with enough definitive power behind a decision to trump the cynical & irrational vehicle private interests and their surrogate politicians have built themselves.

    If you look at political history – every meaningful movement has lept into viability first through the courts. A judge or panel of judges willingness to apply the law in a clear way with reverence to the best of the ideals and legal framework that has kept this nation checked & protected against the apathy of most & the ill will of the few behind the wheel. whether it be the progressive movement/labor, abolition, womyn’s suffrage, people with disabilities, etc. each of these examples of progress & movement has a court case (or series of such) a decade prior that fostered the pressure & momentum to turn a few idealist’s relentless effort into a great many more’s political will.

    If we build recoginition for common/public interest management of landscape & greater enfranchise wildlife in the courts, then that pressure will mount & the truth of the cynical status quo that so many managers don’t even realize they’re working to perpetuate, will be harder & harder to hold. The absurdity will come into greater contrast.

    Some are afraid of this approach, & in all honesty, I often rage or sarcastically diminish our lawyers’ incrementalist caution – you’ll see this next week – but the frustration that prompts this impatient response has less to do with its efficacy, and more to do with the goddamn managers’ & politicians’ subjective apathy. They could turn this boat with such greater ease – but they won’t unless they have a judge’s order to hide behind.

    At any rate – I believe bison advocacy could benefit – supplement the fine efforts already underway. I’ve put my shoulder behind it – for better or for worse 😉 – we’ve secured energetic & brilliant lawyers who have forged a strategy – hopefully you’ll be convinced & willing to help be a leading voice – help give them the fodder they need to draw up the heat/tension in addition to other necessary efforts –

    we know how to agitate in a way that brings discomfort to decisions made without the interest of wildlife in mind. sadly – from what I understand, it helps to have that to get beurocrats to respond to good ideas or ‘the right thing’.

    at the very least, hopefully it’ll be a nice day in some spectacular country. we’ll get to learn about wildlife, fish, habitat, landscape – the system – the cool thing is even a basic knowledge of these things – not overly technical – is the inspiration as well as the fodder. we look forward to seeing you out there.

  8. Jim Macdonald Says:

    I really do come with an open mind and look forward to the workshop.

    Successful social movements (and failed ones as well) have a varied history. I’m always open to a diversity of tactics and can see myself being useful if only because I’m not in the field and can perhaps be most useful – besides in organizing and disseminating information – by doing the kinds of things that aren’t sexy but can be effective.

    And, besides, I look forward to seeing old friends and camping out under the beautiful Hebgen Lake sky.

  9. IzabelaM Says:

    Save Bears,
    I and others who belived in a change deserve “I told you so”.. 🙂
    I think, being 52 and still naive makes me feel younger..joking here.
    I am not happy..did we have a choice? Grandpa and caribou Barbie…yuck.
    I am looking forward driving to Island Park in a couple of weeks.
    I will see my buffalo and hope to see a wolf. Already planning next trip for September.

  10. IzabelaM Says:

    Save Bears,
    I respect what you say. Where are you?
    Maybe my husband and I can meet you.

  11. Save bears Says:

    Hi IzabelaM,

    Currently I am in Northern Idaho, I will be moving down south and working just north of the Bison range in 10 days, doing some really nice Bison dung studies! until about the 17th of September, then I have to attend a wedding in WA, State , so I don’t know if I will be able to be in the same area as you guys are, if things change, then perhaps.


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