Kim Trotter: Arguments for rebuilding Teton Dam don’t hold water

Some bad ideas just won’t die-

My first involvement in a conservation battle was trying to stop the building of the Teton Dam. We lost. It failed in June 1976 as it was filling for the first time. It killed eleven and cost a billion dollars in damage payouts. It would have been a money loser even if it had functioned. We had even told the judge the dam wouldn’t hold water. He laughed and said, “well it won’t drown out those elk then.” Eleven people died because of this fool and others.

Now rebuilding the dam at this porous site in the mouth of the trout filled and wildlife rich canyon has surfaced again. When it doesn’t work this time, it will be Idaho taxpayers picking up tab, not just Uncle Stupid.

Kim Trotter: Arguments for rebuilding Teton Dam don’t hold water. Opinion in the Idaho Statesman.

Posted in Fish, politics, water issues. Tags: , . Comments Off on Kim Trotter: Arguments for rebuilding Teton Dam don’t hold water

Some company wants to put hydropower on Quake Lake!

Looks like the agency and groups are jumping off the wall. Good!

Story about this idiot proposal. By Jessica Mayrer. Bozeman Chronicle staff writer

Who’s Afraid of…

On the Mexican wolf recovery program-

“The [Mexican] wolves will go extinct,” Michael Robinson, conservation advocate with the nonprofit Center for Biological Diversity, says. “If the program is continued exactly the way it is now, these wolves will go extinct.”

– – – – –

In my view the federal government’s Mexican Wolf Recovery program is one of the most screwed up, politicized, and incompetent recovery programs the federal government has ever done. Wolves reproduce rapidly, and while we should not expect the rapid population growth here like the wolves in the northern Rockies because the Mexican wolf is extinct in the wild, there is plenty of prey and the Mexican wolves usually adapt  quickly to the wild, have pups, and their pups have pups if the federal government doesn’t shot them first.

Recovery was on track until 2003 when the Fish and Wildlife Service signed an agreement establishing the Adaptive Management Oversight Committee (“A MOC”). The local livestock operators are required to do even less than their counterparts in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. It’s like leaving their truck full of fuel, with keys in the ignition, and their credit card on the seat.

As a result, now the population is stagnant, having declined to 50 animals. It is like a minor “put and take” fishery. Note that this analogy is not original with me. Ralph Maughan

Who’s Afraid of… The big bad wolf? When it comes to New Mexico’s recovery program, the real fear is the wolves won’t be saved. By Laura Paskus. Sante Fe Reporter.

Footloose Montana Proposes “Montana Trap-Free Public Lands Initiative”

The ban on traps would apply to public lands only-

Story in the Great Falls Tribune. Group aims to put a stop to trapping on public lands. By Michael Babcock.  Great Falls Tribune Outdoor Editor.

– – – – –

News Release from Footloose, Montana-

Footloose Montana Proposes
“Montana Trap-Free Public Lands Initiative”

Helena, Mont. – Public lands in Montana will become trap-free, if an initiative filed today with the Secretary of State qualifies for the November 2010 general election and is approved by a majority of voters. Download Initiative

The “Montana Trap-Free Public Lands Initiative” would prohibit trapping on public lands in Montana, except for scientific, public health and safety activities.  Under the initiative, proposed by the Florence-based group, Footloose Montana, trapping on private lands, which comprise 65 percent of the state, will not be affected. Read the rest of this entry »