Various stories on the big wolf lawsuit injunction

Of course, media coverage has been intense. Here are a number of stories that hopefully provide a variety of viewpoints.

Regional stories and editorials-


Judge orders wolf relisting. Casper Star Tribune.
Judge restores wolf protection. Jackson Hole News and Guide


Wolves again have federal protection. By Rocky Barker. Idaho Statesman.
Back to square one with wolves. By Nate Poppino. Times-News


Molloy restores ESA protection for wolves. By Matthew Brown, Associated Press and the Missoulian
Wolf Protections Restored in Northern Rockies, Hunting Halted. By Peter Metcalf. New West.


Judge Returns Gray Wolves to Endangered List. By Felicity Barringer. New York Times.
Gray wolves get back their endangered species status, for now. Los Angeles Times.


Federal Judge Orders Endangered Species Act Protections Reinstated for Grey Wolves – At Least For Now. The Questionable Authority. By Mike Dunford.

District Judge Reverses Gray Wolf Delisting Throughout Northern Rockies. News release from Defenders of Wildlife.
The long road to victory for wolves.
By Louisa Willcox. NRDC

Barker says, “I blew it.”

Rocky Barker had predicted a day earlier that the plaintiffs in the case were not likely to get an injuction.

Molloy puts wolves back on the endangered species list. Rocky Barker. Letters from the West. Idaho Statesman.

Are the ways forest fires are fought and prevented wise?

As summer advances, debate over the handling of forest fires, is one again on the front burner.

Are the ways forest fires are being fought and prevent “firewise?By Heath Druzin and Rocky Barker. Idaho Statesman. “We spend billions attacking almost every wildfire, but scientists say that’s bad for the forest, can put firefighters in unnecessary danger and doesn’t protect communities as well- or as cheaply – as we now know how to do.”

Reporters Druzin and Barker cite USDA’s inspector general who concludes that too many Americans who live to areas prone to forest fires do not join with their neighbors and/or accept personal responsibility to construct and landscape their homes in a way to reduce the danger of being burned in a wildfire. This is due in considerable measure to the federal effort to put out every fire and throw billions into wildfire suppression with no constraints.

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I believe their has been a decline in personal responsibility, but then I might be criticized as sounding cranky.

Note: please read the sidebar on rangefires. They are quite different the forest fires, and there are far too many of them. The result and the cause is mostly the spread of the flammable exotic cheatgrass.