Wyoming legislature is working on another defective wolf bill

Folks might be getting confused as to all the wolf bills that have been introduced into the current Wyoming legislature, move and bit, and then die.

Now another one is moving in the Wyoming state senate. This is the last week of the legislative session.

This, like the others, is most likely to be rejected by the US Fish and Wildlife Service if it becomes state law. It is yet another bill that would restrict wolves to a tiny area in Wyoming and take a completely hostile approach to wolves in general.

Story in the Casper Star Tribune. [State] Senate trims wolf management area. By Ben Neary.

Update. Feb. 28. Wyoming Senate passes wolf control bill; House up next. Billings Gazette.

CHEYENNE – The Wyoming Senate on Tuesday approved a wolf management plan that calls for giving the governor’s office authority to negotiate with the federal government over the boundaries of a permanent wolf area in the northwestern corner of the state.

. . . .

On Monday, the Senate had voted to exclude most private land from a permanent management area in which wolves would be managed as trophy game animals. Outside that area, they would be managed as predators that could be shot on sight.

Mitch King, regional director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Denver, had said Monday that any reduction of the management area his agency had proposed last fall would be unacceptable. He said a reduction would lead to his agency rejecting a state wolf management plan.

Posted in Delisting, politics, Wolves, Wyoming wolves. Comments Off on Wyoming legislature is working on another defective wolf bill

Why is Butch afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?

This is from Alan Gregory’s Conservation News Blog. Why is Butch [Otter] afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?

Dale Bosworth talks about his tenure as Chief Forester

Recently retired  Chief Forester Bosworth sat down with John S. Adams of the Missoula Independent.
Coming Home. By John S. Adams. Former Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth on fire, frustration and the future of the woods

Dale Bosworth returned to Missoula last week after a six-year stint in Washington, D.C., as chief of the U.S. Forest Service. Bosworth, pictured here at his home west of Missoula, spent part of his first day back talking to the Independent.

Posted in public lands, public lands management. Comments Off on Dale Bosworth talks about his tenure as Chief Forester

Congress puts focus on West’s evolution

Actually what happened was the House Natural Resources Committee, now under new management 🙂 held a hearing on the transformation of the West’s economics and society, and balancing that with conserving the beauty and resources.

The most notable thing was those who were invited to testify — no oil company lobbyists and land developers like defeated ex-chair Richard Pombo would have stacked the hearing list with.

Two Native Americans were invited to testify!

Story from the Missoulian. Congress puts focus on West’s evolution. By Noelle Straub.

Posted in politics. Comments Off on Congress puts focus on West’s evolution

Too many ATVs in Spread Creek, WY area; scare elk

Spread Creek rises east of Jackson Hole and flow into the Park. It is terrible fishing because it was degraded by a dam to divert waters to Elk Ranch Reservoir for irrigating hayfields for CATTLE inside Grand Teton National Park.

The lower reaches of Spread Creek are lousy for fish, but the country around it is great elk country, moose, deer, bear and wolf too. The Bridger-Teton NF is supposed to have wildlife management as the number one multiple use for the area, but ATV crowds are pushing in.

This story is about Wyoming Game and Fish Department asking the US Forest Service to limit the Spread Creek area to reduce ATV density because they scare the elk on their summer range. The Forest Service sure seems to be proposing a lot of motorized access for a wildlife first area.

Of course, the Blue Ribbon (blue smoke) Coalition was there to speak up for the fat the lazy.

Story in the Jackson Hole News and Guide. State: ATVs scaring elk. By Cory Hatch

See also, Elk prefer people on foot. Study finds ATVs, bikes disturb them most. Jackson Hole News and Guide. By Corey Hatch.

A winter of failure for brucellosis elk trapping near Pinedale, WY

In the second year of a project called “sadly misconceived” by conservationists, 173 elk were trapped at Muddy Creek feedground near Pinedale. 79 of the elk were adult females.
13 of the 79 tested seropositive for brucellosis and were slaughtered. “Seropositive” means the elk had antibodies — they had been exposed to brucellosis. A smaller percentage, undetermined, actually had brucellosis and were infectious.

The criticism is that the program is very expensive in time, effort, and unnecessary slaughter of elk, with few to no benefits because the petpetuation of the disease is in the winter feeding of Wyoming elk throughout the NW part of the state.

Story in the Casper Star Tribune. Numbers of elk trapped decline from last year. By Whitney Royster. Casper Star-Tribune environmental reporter.

Posted in Elk, wildlife disease. Comments Off on A winter of failure for brucellosis elk trapping near Pinedale, WY

Defending the West is virtue

deer-potamogeton-park.jpg

At Potamogeton Park, Madison Range, Montana. Gallatin National Forest. Photo by Ralph Maughan

I believe that spending as much of your life as possible defending the Western lands, water, air and wildlife is an act of pure virtue.Your actions needs no other justification, but make sure you get plenty of time out on the land so that it doesn’t get to be an abstraction. Turning into a symbol rather than a presence is dangerous.whitepine9.jpg

White Pine Range, north central Nevada. Humboldt National Forest. Photo copyright Ralph Maughan